Ready, Aim, Fire

Lockheed Martin receives Phase II contract for DARPA's DInGO advanced combat rifle scope

DInGO DARPA recently awarded Lockheed Martin a $3.7 million contract for Phase II of its DInGO system, which will enable soldiers to accurately view targets between three and 600 meters without changing scopes or suffering a decrease in optical resolution.

The Dynamic Image Gunsight Optic (DInGO) program led by Lockheed Martin's combat optic designers in Akron, Ohio, continues its trajectory to become DARPA's provider for an advanced rifle site to enhance troops' marksmen skills.  

DARPA recently awarded Lockheed Martin a $3.7 million contract for Phase II of its DInGO system. Over the next 14 months, the Lockheed Martin team will deliver 16 prototype units. DInGO will enable soldiers to accurately view targets at varying distances without changing scopes or suffering a decrease in optical resolution.  The system will enhance soldiers' ability to accurately hit targets at a range of between three and 600 meters.

In Phase II, the team will expand the system's capability through scope image enhancement, target tracking and ballistics correction, as well as demonstrating a brass board prototype DInGO rifle sight that would be used on existing M4 and M16 infantry combat rifles.

"In this next phase we'll continue to enhance the capability for users to help them overcome some of the conditions they face in combat," said John Wojnar, program manager.

DInGO automatically calculates the range with a low power laser rangefinder, digitally zooms in on it and then accounts for environmental conditions such as wind using sensors built into the scope. It then projects the bullet's point-of-impact calculated from the embedded ballistics computer. It uses the latest technology in lenses, imagers and displays that enables troops to keep both hands on their weapons as they use them from up-close or from a quarter mile away. 

During the first phase, which was awarded last year, the Akron-based Lockheed Martin team developed the initial DInGO system.