Raising the Bar with AMDR

Lockheed Martin submits Air and Missile Defense Radar proposal for next class of Aegis destroyers

 

AMDR-Air_460 Lockheed Martin recently submitted its proposal to the U.S. Navy for the third and final phase of a competition to provide two of three key elements of the Air and Missile Defense Radar suite for the next class of Aegis-equipped destroyers.

When Lockheed Martin’s SPY-1 radar entered active service in 1983, it set the standard for naval radars for the next 30 years.  Now, Lockheed Martin plans to raise the bar again with its new Air and Missile Defense Radar (AMDR).

The next generation solid-state radar for the Navy's future DDG 51 Flight III ships, AMDR offers a wide detection range and improved accuracy over legacy technology. AMDR will provide significantly improved multi-mission capabilities, simultaneously supporting long-range, exoatmospheric detection, tracking and discrimination of ballistic missiles, and improved area and ship self-defense against advanced air and surface threats.

Lockheed Martin recently submitted its proposal to the U.S. Navy for the third and final phase of a competition to provide two of three key elements of the AMDR Suite for the next class of Aegis-equipped destroyers.

In the coming months, the Navy plans to award a single Engineering and Manufacturing Development Phase contract for the continued development of the AMDR S-Band sensor and the Radar Suite Controller (RSC). The third ADMR element, an X-Band sensor, is not part of this competition.

AMDR-S will provide volume search, tracking, ballistic missile defense discrimination and missile communications. The RSC interfaces with the ship’s combat system while managing and coordinating the operation of AMDR-S and AMDR-X.

“Our team has developed a mature, affordable and highly reliable radar system with substantial investment by our company and the Navy,” said Carl Bannar, vice president and general manager of Integrated Warfare Systems & Sensors at Lockheed Martin. “Designed with the sailor in mind, our modular, open hardware and software architectures minimize ship design changes, simplify operation and maintenance, and enable capability improvements to accommodate future mission needs.”

Lockheed Martin was one of three companies awarded a 24-month Technology Development (TD) Phase contract for AMDR in 2010. The TD Phase will be completed on September 30, 2012.


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