Helping Put Heroes Back to Work

Lockheed Martin presents a check to the IVMF as part of a partnership that will help veterans and military families make the transition to post-service life. From left to right: Dale Bennett, Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Training executive vice president; Mike Haynie, IVMF executive director and founder; Alan Lincoln, senior director of corporate relations, Syracuse University;  and Emily Simone, Lockheed Martin Global Community Outreach director.

With around 1 million military service members expected to make the transition to civilian life in the next five years, Lockheed Martin is committed to addressing the issues many of these individuals will face. 

“The veteran unemployment situation has been a real challenge, and the unemployment rate for post-9/11 veterans is significantly higher,” said Mike Haynie, executive director and founder of the Institute for Veterans and Military Families at Syracuse University (IVMF). “It’s a complicated situation, and a big part of it is how to translate those skills learned in the military and educate employers.”

Established in June 2011 as the first Institute of its kind in the U.S., the IVMF conducts research to drive national dialogue and action on the social, economic, education and policy issues impacting veterans and their families.

As part of a partnership announced Jan. 23, Lockheed Martin will provide a $500,000 grant over the next three years to support the organization’s four career transition programs. In addition to the grant, the corporation will work directly with IVMF staff and researchers on industry and entrepreneurship training programs.    

To date, the IVMF’s Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans with Disabilities (EBV) has had more than 600 students graduate from the program. Of those graduates, more than 70 percent successfully launched a business within the first four years.

 “This grant creates additional capacity for us to get more veterans through our programs,” Haynie said. “It also seeds the development of new programs, especially when we look at economically focused challenges and the challenges facing female veterans.”

Through its extensive research and programming, the IVMF is addressing issues that are particularly important to companies like Lockheed Martin, which dedicates significant resources to hiring veterans and working with veteran-owned small businesses.

The Get Skills to Work Coalition
GE’s recently launched Get Skills to Work coalition brings together companies like Lockheed Martin, Alcoa and Boeing to focus on training veterans in the skills needed for long-term careers. This partnership has helped 15,000 veterans transfer experiences gained during active duty to a career in the aerospace and defense industry.

“We’re committed to supporting these returning military service members by engaging in partnerships with organizations like the IVMF and by working with our industry peers to close the employment gap,” said Lockheed Martin Global Community Outreach Director Emily Simone.

Through Get Skills to Work, the industry expects to reach 100,000 veterans by 2015. In addition, Lockheed Martin offers programs to ensure recent hires are successful in their new careers and provides ample training opportunities to veteran-owned small businesses throughout the year.

“One of the barriers the IVMF is trying to overcome is to better understand and address the challenges being faced by transitioning military personnel,” Simone said. “We’re committed to helping veterans make that post-service transition, and this partnership is just one way we can help move the needle forward.”

Posted January 25, 2013

Photo caption: Lockheed Martin presents a check to the IVMF as part of a partnership that will help veterans and military families make the transition to post-service life. From left to right: Dale Bennett, Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Training executive vice president; Mike Haynie, IVMF executive director and founder; Alan Lincoln, senior director of corporate relations, Syracuse University;  and Emily Simone, Lockheed Martin Global Community Outreach director.

highlights
  • Established in June 2011 as the first Institute of its kind in the U.S., the IVMF conducts research to drive national dialogue and action on the social, economic, education and policy issues impacting veterans and their families.
  • GE’s recently launched Get Skills to Work coalition brings together companies like Lockheed Martin, Alcoa and Boeing to focus on training veterans in the skills needed for long-term careers.