Supporting the World’s Largest Environmental Cleanup

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Under a recently-announced contract extension, Mission Support Alliance (MSA) will continue to provide site support services at the Department of Energy’s Hanford site through May 2017. Lockheed Martin, alongside teammates Jacobs Engineering and WSI, comprise the MSA team responsible for helping the Department of Energy (DOE) and other contractors at the Hanford site facilitate the world’s largest environmental cleanup project.

In honor of providing infrastructure and site services for three more years, here are three examples of how MSA has applied innovative approaches to help the Hanford site operate more efficiently and effectively:

1.    “Greening” the Fleet: The MSA team shifted the Hanford site vehicle fleet to more green vehicles; today, four of every five new vehicles purchased for the site are alternative fuel, hybrid, or electric vehicles. In addition to operating at lower costs, these new vehicles help reduce greenhouse gases and negative impacts to the environment as workers traverse the Hanford site.

2.    Transitioning to Virtual Desktops: Imagine the challenges supporting information technology (IT) resources across the 586 square mile Hanford Site. By transitioning to virtual desktops, also known as zero-client environments or thin clients, MSA helped enable Hanford site workers to have access to their IT resources from every building and any hardware platform. This also improved security, since data is not locally stored on hardware assets, and allowed for data center consolidation which saves power and costs.

3.    Turning Data into Information: Another way the MSA team has helped Hanford run more efficiently is by developing information management systems that improve site operations. For example, a web-based tool called GeoVis combines mapping resources, real-time project data and actual cost and schedule information for an at-a-glance status of various cleanup projects on the Hanford Site.

“This Hanford contract extension is great news and is a testament to MSA’s good work in meeting and exceeding the needs of its customers,” said Frank Armijo, MSA President and General Manager and Lockheed Martin Vice President of Energy Solutions. “The work we have accomplished at Hanford has made MSA a proven performer in the areas of safety, security, customer service and innovations that have allowed us to save DOE over $161 million since our contract began in 2009.”

The three-year contract extension allows MSA to continue implementing long-term plans for the site’s infrastructure and legacy land management, as well as prepare for future operations on the Hanford Site.

Employing approximately 1,500 workers, MSA’s responsibilities include safety, health, quality and training; emergency services; site infrastructure and logistics; site business management; information resources/content management; energy and environment; and portfolio management for both the Richland Operations Office and the Office of River Protection.

The 586-square-mile Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state played a pivotal role in the nation’s defense for more than 40 years, beginning in the 1940s with the Manhattan Project. Formerly a plutonium production complex with nine nuclear reactors and associated processing facilities, Hanford is today engaged in the world’s largest environmental cleanup project. For additional information on the Department of Energy’s Office of Environmental Management and on the Hanford Site visit www.em.doe.gov or www.hanford.gov.

January 10, 2014

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highlights
  • As part of Mission Support Alliance, three ways we’ve taken an innovative approach to help the Hanford site save more than $161 million since 2009
  • “The work we have accomplished at Hanford has made MSA a proven performer in the areas of safety, security, customer service and innovations that have allowed us to save DOE over $161 million since our contract began in 2009.”

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