Palo Alto Colloquia

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April 17, 2014                    
 
HISTORICAL INNOVATIONS IN TELESCOPE TECHNOLOGY IN ENGLAND IN THE 17TH, 18TH, AND 19TH CENTURIES – A TOUR WITH THE ANTIQUE TELESCOPE SOCIETY
 

Dr. Kenneth Lum
 
Following the invention and initial improvement of the telescope in the Netherlands in early 17th Century, most of the innovation in telescope technology passed into England in the late 17th Century with important contributions mainly by the Germans. Most notable of these were the invention of the reflecting telescope by Isaac Newton in 1668 and the achromatic lens beginning around the 1730s by Chester Moore Hall and John Dolland in England, and Samuel Klingenstierna in Sweden. These innovations improved the most pressing defects of telescopes at the time which were chromatic aberration and spherical aberration. They allowed telescopes to be built with shorter and more manageable lengths while giving better images. Improvements in metal working technology driven by the Industrial Revolution in England and glass making technology in Germany allowed larger and more mechanically precise telescopes to be made by the 18th and early 19th Centuries. Dr. Lum will give a travelogue of some of the places where some of these innovations took place along with visits to other important places in the history of astronomy in England during a 1996 Antique Telescope Society visit. Among the places he visited was the house in Bath, England where William Herschel and his sister, Caroline lived and discovered the planet, Uranus, in 1781, and the Royal Greenwich Observatory where efforts were made to determine longitude at sea.
 
Dr. Kenneth Lum is recently retired from the practice of Emergency Medicine. Since high school, he has also been an enthusiastic amateur astronomer, having built two telescopes at the Adler Planetarium in Chicago and a large Newtonian reflector when he reentered amateur astronomy in 1986. He pursued an interest in astronomical photography during the 1990s and continues to study the history of astronomy and astronomical instrumentation. Dr. Lum is currently interested in ways to enhance the performance of small telescopes with the use of a photomultiplier eyepiece and astronomical video cameras. Since 1994, he has been traveling with the Antique Telescope Society almost annually visiting different historical astronomical observatories.

2014_April-17_Lum_Innov-Telescopes

We are moving back to the Bldg. 202 Auditorium (where we were a year ago).  Note That construction on the new building (B. 245, next to B. 202) is ongoing, but parking is available below B. 202. All Colloquium  talks begin at 4:15 pm

Future Colloquia.

Note, the following are TENTATIVE  

2014
Apr.   24 – Dr. Tom Passell, former ATC employee and recently retired from SRI and EPRI: Deuteron Stripping with Nuclei of Metals that Absorb Deuterium
May    1 – Dr. Akram Boukai, CEO and Co-Founder, Silicium Energy:  Nano-Justified: Why Nano Matters for Silicon Thermoelectrics
May    8 – Dr. Craig R Horne, Ph.D. Chief Strategy Officer & Co-Founder, EnerVault Corporation.  YES VIRGINA, THERE IS A LONG-DURATION, GRID-SCALE REDOX FLOW BATTERY SYSTEM
May  15 – Dr. Uwe Bergmann, SLAC:  LCLS - The New X-Ray Laser at SLAC
May  22 – Dr. Gary Bush, LM/ATC:  The Latest on High Speed Rail (Again!!)
May  29 – Dr.  Ken Lum.  Telescopes of Bernhard Schmidt.
June   5 –  Dr. Perdomo-Ortiz , NASA Ames:  NASA Quantum Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
June  12 – SUMMER BREAK, START SERIES AGAIN IN MID to LATE SEPTEMBER 2014
Sept.  18 – Mr. Greg Edwards. Privacy and big data
Sept.  25 –

 

 

 

 

 

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Colloquia presentations via Microsoft Lync

All Colloquium talks begin at 4:15 pm

Audio: AT&T Conference call:
408-742-3800, Pin 729281#

For further information contact:
Dr. Gary Bush
650-424-2267
gary.bush@lmco.com
or
Dr. Stuart McHugh
650-424-2561
stuart.mchugh@lmco.com