Orion Exploration Flight Test-1

NASA’s Orion spacecraft, is set to launch aboard a
United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket December 4, 2014.
The 4.5 hour mission extends from ~7:05 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. EST. Liftoff will occur from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Pad 37. Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1) will be the first high orbital test flight for the Orion spacecraft. The flight will test systems that are critical to crew safety. EFT-1 is a significant step forward for America’s space program; it’s our first step on a journey to deep space.

 

WHAT IS THE PURPOSE OF EFT-1?
We’ll push our systems to the limit, and the lessons we learn will shape every future deep space mission and keep crews safe.

EFT-1 will provide engineers with data about systems critical to crew safety such as heat shield performance, separation events, avionics and software performance, attitude control and guidance, parachute deployment, and recovery operations to validate designs of the spacecraft before it begins carrying humans to new destinations in deep space.

 

Lockheed Martin is prime contractor building Orion, NASA’s next-generation spacecraft designed to transport humans to destinations beyond low Earth orbit and bring them safely home. Orion is the most reliable, safe and affordable option to provide human spaceflight to destinations in deep space such as asteroids, the moon, and Mars.

 

RADIATION PROTECTION Deep space radiation can seriously harm astronauts and damage critical equipment. Mars-bound spacecraft will need upgraded radiation protection to safeguard crew.

 

RADIATION EXPOSURE:

3 DAYS ON MARS =

1 YEAR ON EARTH

KEEPING ASTRONAUTS HEALTHY AND SAFE  

 

 

EARTH INDEPENDENT  

 

 

 

BY THE NUMBERS . . .
Orion is ready for reentry temperatures as high as 4,000°F. That’s hotter than lava, but not quite as hot as the sun’s surface.
Orion’s total habitable space inside measures 316 cubic feet. Or, about 2 average-sized minivans for future Mars-goers to move around freely.
 

Orion is ready for its 20,000 mph reentry. At that speed you could travel from NYC to Tokyo in 20 min.

 

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